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The new episode is here!

Spiraling Towards Divorce: Cold Turkey, the 4/4/4/2 Meeting, and the L/M “Myth” – 8 L/M Breakup Series

In part 8 of the L/M Breakup Series, Diana and Phoebe explore the events, meetings, maneuvers and negotiations that took place during the first half of September 1969. They trace how things start to escalate and go off the tracks following the relative harmony of the Abbey Road sessions. Covered in this episode are: John and Yoko’s cold turkey experience, Mary McCartney’s birth, The Isle of Wight festival, the 4/4/4/2 meeting and the “myth” of Lennon/McCartney.

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Anonymous asked:

Hi. I love your podcast. Just have one comment on your interpretation of Come Together. Ono Sideboard isn’t about Yoko being on the “side”. In English houses, a sideboard is a small dresser to keep your best china. Adults also use them to keep valuables away from children. I was never allowed to go in my Grandma’s sideboard, I always wondered what was in there. John must have kept his valuables (his heart? his secrets? hopes? future plans?) for her to be his sideboard. That’s my interpretation.

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Thank you for that information! That’s a lovely interpretation which could be true!

Anonymous asked:

Hello, I’ve really been enjoying your podcast but as an Asian American woman it upset me to hear you (in 3.b) both be so dismissive to the possibility of a racist element in the reaction to Yoko in the 60s. Your gleeful and mocking disdain for Yoko in general left me feeling uncomfortable. But that it extends to the point you can not envision how challenging the world was for an Asian woman living in a very white, conventional England in the sixties is upsetting to say the least.

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Hi listener,

Thank you for this thoughtful ask on an important topic!

We deeply regret any implication that we don’t believe Yoko faced special and unfair challenges due to race or nationality, because we are absolutely positive that Yoko faced racism, sexism and anti-Japanese sentiment in the 1960s (and probably still does today).

In 3.b we were specifically suggesting that the cause of the negative public reaction to Yoko was not solely about race, but mainly due to her behaviors, attitudes and artistic eccentricities such as her unconventional fashion sense, her jarring and very unusual singing style, her bizarre art and artistic “happenings” (the nude album, the interviews in black bags, throwing acorns at their TV audience, etc).  Yoko was a conceptual artist whose career was founded on shock value and making people uncomfortable, so from our POV it is disingenuous for John & Yoko to be surprised or offended when people react with shock and discomfort. 

John and Yoko were weird, unconventional and provocative (which they embraced), and this alienated almost everyone virtually overnight, which is why we find it unhelpful to attribute her negative public reception to the single cause of racism.  This is not to say we don’t believe she experienced racism; of course she did!  But both things can be true at once.  She can experience racism and she can also be disliked for reasons having nothing to do with racism.

Similarly, we don’t think the reaction to Linda, as touched on in this quote was based soley in anti-semitism.  At the same time it would be absolutely insane to suggest that Linda had never experienced anti-semitism in her lifetime.

In the breakup series we are mainly focused on the dynamics within the group, and we believe their primary issue with Yoko seems to have been her disruptive and unwelcome presence within a creative space which for years had been the sole domain of the bandmates. 

In any case, we sincerely apologize for upsetting you.  

We never want to reduce Yoko to her sex or race, which we feel is both unfair to her and an impediment to a candid examination of her work (which we think has been absent from Beatles discourse).  One of our biggest complaints is how Beatles authors only evaluate Yoko as an influence on John, and never allow her to stand or fall as an individual artist in her own right.

As for our occasional mocking of Yoko (which often includes John), we can assure you that has nothing to do with race either. Any disdain on our part is reserved for the self-aggrandizing tone with which John and Yoko often discuss themselves and their art. 

We acknowledge that it can be difficult and challenging to be critical about a woman with such a controversial place in history, perhaps undervalued as an artist and subject to some unfair prejudices.  We have tried to strike a balance in terms of being empathetic to Yoko as a person while simultaneously subjecting her to the same rigor we would any artist, including the Beatles – whom she famously considered herself to be as good or better than.  

Thanks again for taking the time to write to us and share your reactions. We will continue to consider this important topic in the future.

50 years ago today, the Let It Be album was released!

Listen to “If I Ran Away From You,” our series on the Beatles’ breakup, to hear our analysis of the songs, as well as the interpersonal dynamics of Lennon/McCartney during the recording of the “Get Back” project!

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“If I Ran Away from You: Part 7.B″ Love, War, and the Games that Ended the Beatles

In this two-part episode Diana and Phoebe dig into the relatively under-explored Abbey Road period and the songs that resulted from it. They examine both the songs and the events surrounding the creation of the album through the lens of the breakup.

In the second installment, they discuss the Medley, “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” and the overarching themes of the album.

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“If I Ran Away from You: Part 7.A″ Love, War, and the Games that Ended the Beatles

In this two-part episode, Diana and Phoebe dig into the relatively
under-explored Abbey Road period and the songs that resulted from it.
They examine both the songs and the events surrounding the creation of
the album through the lens of the breakup.

In the first installment, Phoebe and Diana will explore the recording
sessions as well as the songs “Come Together”, “Something”, “Maxwell’s
Silver Hammer,” “Oh Darling,” “Octopus’ Garden,” “Here Comes the Sun,”
and “Because”.

In the second installment, they will discuss the Medley, “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” and the overarching themes of the album.

Where to Listen

Wash your hands and keep social distancing!

Another Kind of Mind will be back soon with a new episode to help you through the quarantine!

A crossection of John and Paul shots from 1969, as referenced in Part 6 of “If I Ran Away from You,” our podcast series on The Beatles breakup.

Anonymous asks:

Episode 6 is the best episode yet!! I love how you pointed out Paul’s reasons for endorsing the JohnandYoko union, even though he knew it wasn’t ideal. You made a lot of really fantastic, articulate points. Your take on this whole breakup is literally the only one that I’ve seen that makes sense.

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Thank you so much, listener! We worked incredibly hard on it, so we appreciate your acknowledgement, and are so happy you enjoyed it! 🙂

– Diana and Phoebe

“If I Ran Away from You: Part 5″ Love, War, and the Games that Ended the Beatles

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In this episode, Diana and Phoebe explore the Battle for Northern Songs, which raged throughout the Spring and Summer of 1969. They go deep into this topic, providing detail and context as they investigate Paul’s infamous extra shares and explore the psychological impact of the loss of their publishing rights.
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Be sure also to subscribe to us, and leave us a rating or review on whichever podcast platform you use!  It will go a long way in helping people find us! 🙂
Thank you once more to all of our listeners for listening to us and for leaving so many kind words of support, and sharing our project with other Beatles fans! 

Listen to our Breakup series: If I Ran Away from You (and our other episodes, too)!

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Anonymous asked:

Thanks so much for the podcast. I’ve devoured each episode voraciously the past week and it’s been such a source of enjoyment. Your characterization of John is spot on. Definitely not some macho guy nor a sincere revolutionary. While I’ve had the same take on him for years as y’all, I’ve never connected the dots between his personality traits and the breakup. The sequence of events you lay out and your analysis of it MAKES SENSE.

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Thank you so much, listener! 🙂 We really appreciate this and we’re so glad thst you’re enjoying the show!

– Thalia and the AKOM crew