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Tagpaul mccartney

thebackseatofmycar asked:

I haven’t really seen it being discussed before, (if it has, my bad! I just haven’t seen it yet) but what songs do you guys think Paul wrote (or just speculated to have written) about his breakup with Jane? I would find it out of character for him to not process it through song in some type of way.

~ Our Tumblr Asks

Hello @thebackseatofmycar,

Thanks for the question! Although this type of speculation can be controversial, it can also be fun. We think Jane was the inspiration of SO MANY of Paul’s Beatles songs! Even though both Jane and Paul are quiet/private about their relationship, it is a bit strange that Jane is never discussed as one of rock’s greatest muses (as opposed to say, Pattie Boyd).

In any case, here are a few that I personally think are either directly or indirectly written about Jane:

And I Love Her
Things We Said Today
Another Girl (what an asshole!)
The Night Before
You Won’t See Me (again, asshole)
I’m Looking Through You
We Can Work it Out
For No One
Honey Pie
Can You Take Me Back?
Let it Be
Long and Winding Road

To be honest, most of those are sorta break-up songs (or at least lover’s quarrel songs)!

But I assume your original question is about their final breakup in summer 68. In that event, I would say all Paul’s break-up/sad songs of that era (or just all his songs in general) are potentially about Jane in some way.  Of course in this late-Beatles era Paul is also processing the estrangement from John, which he also took very hard/seriously, so this could be (and probably was) factoring into those songs as well.

Maybe Paul’s upcoming Lyrics book will shed light on these?  (HAHA, just kidding of course they won’t)

Thanks for the ask!

-Phoebe

anotherkindofmindpod:

On this day in 1957, Paul impressed John with his amazing guitar skills and rock star charisma at the Woolton Garden Fete!

As John would reflect many years later, “That was the day, the day that I met Paul, that it started moving.”

Painting by artist Eric Cash

Happy Lennon/McCartney Meetup Day! 🙂❤️

Anonymous asked:

I was wondering if you had any thoughts on any tension that existed between John and Paul’s dad Jim. Particularly John’s “and in the end he chose me.” comments in 1971. We know that Paul in Michael McCartneys words “always did what Dad told him to” and this was obviously a source of tension with John. But was it a control issue? Concern for Paul (we know Jim was still physically disciplining Paul up to the age of 17, but did John?) or was it rooted in something else?

~ Our Tumblr Asks

Hello anon!

Wow, this is a humdinger of a question which opens up a much larger discussion. Perhaps better suited for a full episode than a quick post.

Short answer is that John most likely had both: Jealousy over Jim’s influence and anger at anyone hurting Paul.

It’s not difficult to understand why John would be resentful towards a man who hits a person he loves. Easy to understand why John’s resentment would be exacerbated by Paul’s obvious adoration and loyalty for Jim.

I also agree that John enjoyed a certain influence over Paul simply in terms of John and Paul being like-minded besties who dressed alike, talked alike and loved all the same things AND in terms of encouraging Paul to misbehave, skip school, etc (although again I think this is greatly overplayed because Paul has always been a daredevil with a rebellious streak, even if he didn’t tend to openly defy his father).

I don’t think “control” was the issue because I don’t think John ever controlled Paul! That idea is pure science-fiction to me (even if does make a lot of jean jackets horny). However there is no doubt that John was a major influence on the appearance and demeanor of both Early Beatles and Early Lennon/McCartney.

John’s comment about Jim’s controlling behavior concerned Paul’s hair and clothing, which is something John had particular interest in; John and Paul fused their images almost immediately after hooking up in 1957, and John would understandably want his better half looking cool and fresh to death, both for his own benefit (i.e. Paul’s appearance is a reflection on John) and for his own gratification (John likes looking at Paul and takes pleasure in Paul looking good).

The bigger issue to unpack (which I won’t get into here) is John’s resentment and jealousy over Paul and Jim’s close father-son relationship (imperfect though it may be).

And how John wishes Paul (in his words!) to choose John over his own family, in either a sort of pseudo-star-crossed-lovers or pseudo-devoted-parent scenario (take your pick, it’s a matter of interpretation).

As always with these two, there’s a lot going on.

Thanks for the ask!

anotherkindofmindpod:

Female Protagonists in McCartney Songs

What can we learn about Paul McCartney from the female protagonists in his songbook? Phoebe and Thalia discuss several McCartney compositions featuring prominent female characters and identify their central themes.

Sources:
“Many Years From Now” by Barry Miles (1997)
Interview w/ Allison Anders, Bomb Magazine (1997)
Paul McCartney interview w/ Jonathan Wingate Record Collector (2008)
“Chaos and Creation at Abbey Road” (2006)
“Still I Rise” by Maya Angelou (1978)
“The Oprah Winfrey Show” (1984)
Interview w/ Paul McCartney for Billboard Magazine (2001)
Paul McCartney Interview w/ Susan Goldberg for National Geographic (2017)

PLAYLIST:
She’s Leaving Home (1967)
Jet (1973)
Blackbird (1968)
Jenny Wren (2005)
Working Women at the Top (1991)
It’s Not On (1982)
Temporary Secretary (1980)
Another Day (1971)
Penny Lane (1967)
Eleanor Rigby (1966)
Eleanor’s Dream (1984)
Treat Her Gently/Lonely Old People (1975)
English Tea (2005)
Let it Be (1970)
Imprisonment, Ocean’s Kingdom (2011)
Daytime Nighttime Suffering (1979)
Mama’s Little Girl (1973)
The World You’re Coming Into (1991)
Lady Madonna (1968)
For No One (1966)

Extended Spotify Playlist: Click Here

On Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Podbean, and most other podcast platforms.

A Tumblr User Asked:

Have any of you watched the Understanding Lennon/Mccartney series on YouTube? If yes, what are your thoughts? If not, I would absolutely recommend it

Hi there!

We completely agree that Understanding Lennon/McCartney is an excellent series – all of us at AKOM have seen it and thoroughly enjoy it. We highly recommend this series and all of Breathless345’s work to our listeners!

All the best,

Thalia

New Episode!

An AKOM Toast to RAM at 50 episode

Paul and Linda McCartney’s RAM, now often referred to by many as the “first indie pop album” had its 50th birthday on May 17, 2021!  To commemorate this important milestone anniversary, join Thalia as she gives “An AKOM Toast!” to RAM at 50!  Happy #RAMiversary! 

Available now on most podcast platforms!

SHOW NOTES under the cut

Playlist: 

Part 1: RAM by Paul and Linda McCartney

Too Many People

3 Legs

Ram On

Dear Boy

Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey

Smile Away

Heart Of The Country

Monkberry Moon Delight

Eat At Home

Long Haired Lady

Ram On

The Back Seat Of My Car

Part 2: "Indie Pop Medley"

“Prairie Fire the Wanders About” by Sufjan Stevens 

“Home Again” by Michael Kiwanuka

“Will Do” by TV on the Radio 

“Where Gravity is Dead,” by Laura Veirs 

“The Infanta” by the Decemberists 

“Soul Meets Body by Death Cab for Cutie” 

“Eugene” by Arlo Parks

“Suddenly Everything Has Changed” by the Flaming Lips

“Stella Brown” by Jelani Aryeh

“The Breeze” by Dr. Dog 

“Golden Days” by Whitney 

“Sunrise” by Kenny Elrod

”Let’s Get Lost” by Elliot Smith 

“Pass the Hours” by MorMor

“Lord Only Knows” by Beck

Part 3: Covers of RAM by various artists

“Dear Boy” cover by Death Cab for Cutie

“Too Many People” cover by Dave Depper

 "The Back Seat of My Car" cover by the Damn Crystals

“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” cover by Novelty Island

“Ram On” cover by Found Wandering

“Zpívám si jen tak” (Heart of the Country) cover by Martha & Tena

“Ram On" instrumental cover by They Might Be Giants

“Monkberry Moon Delight” cover by Robbers on High Street

“Ram On” cover by R. Stevie Moore

Links for RAM covers (not found on Spotify): 

“Dear Boy” cover by Death Cab for Cutie: https://youtu.be/kP3z785ebdY 

“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” cover by Novelty Island: https://youtu.be/mtG9j1T3KcI and https://noveltyisland.bandcamp.com/track/uncle-albert-admiral-halsey-paul-linda-mccartney-cover 

“Ram On" instrumental cover by They Might Be Giants https://youtu.be/ouk7p_ambx8 

“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” cover by Holly Henderson: https://youtu.be/9fKg5m5j7M4

“Monkberry Moon Delight” cover by Club Helmbreker https://youtu.be/0m7ydfWqzgk

Spotify Playlist: 

https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5zX162a3FLBpmEtcIhp6sA?si=d80ac33fd1484698

Instrumental covers:

Ryohei Kanayama on YouTubehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5nrctquJucCKcYLrfB4euxU4RMjeGuu8 

Marcel Lichter on YouTube: https://youtu.be/L3vQrh1Xbeg

joehlers on YouTube: https://youtu.be/mmccz9WzHZk 

Recommendations and mentions:

Understanding McCartney Documentary Series by Breathless345 on YouTube: https://youtu.be/kjjqUCvHNIs 

Why Paul McCartney’s RAM is the first Indie Pop Album by Elliot Roberts on YouTube: https://youtu.be/CRZHvvYsc5w

Interview with RAM & Wings drummer Denny Seiwell celebrating Ram On! by Elliot Roberts: https://youtu.be/nx4Lgf-nmKA 

Paul McCartney – Ram (full album) REACTION by Welp Here We Are On YouTube: https://youtu.be/7XU_VpeIUl8

Mentioned: 1971: The Year That Music Changed Everything by Apple TV+

Other Sources:

 Sticky Fingers: The Life and Times of Jann Wenner and Rolling Stone Magazine by Joe Hagan, pg 169, and “Book Review: Sticky Fingers” by Dr. Erin Torkelson Weber,  www.beatlebioreview.wordpress.com  

Ben Gibbard of Death Cab for Cutie: May 7, 2020 quarantine livestream: https://youtu.be/hfLEvRY1kcA

Dave Depper of Death Cab for Cutie, The Ram Project: https://www.davedepper.com/the-ram-projec

The Damn Crystals on their Pure McCartney project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6Gk4KUn-vs

“The Eternal Sunshine of Harry Styles.” Rolling Stone Magazine.  Rob Sheffield.  August 26, 2019. https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/harry-styles-cover-interview-album-871568/

“My Favorite Album: Fred Armisen on Paul and Linda McCartney’s ‘RAM.’”  Under the Radar Magazine. Joshua M. Miller. Jun 22, 2020.  http://www.undertheradarmag.com/interviews/my_favorite_album_fred_armisen_on_paul_and_linda_mccartneys_ram

“Another Day: Paul McCartney’s Once-Maligned, Now-Adored ‘Ram’ at 50.”  The Ringer.  Ben Lindbergh.  May 14, 2021. https://www.theringer.com/music/2021/5/14/22435675/paul-mccartney-ram-50th-anniversary-legacy

The All McCartney Podcast.  Interview with Eirik Wangberg. http://www.allmccartneypodcast.com/episodes/2017/5/25/episode-14-pauls-norwegian-connections-fredrik-skavlan-and-eirik-the-norwegian  

Paul McCartney quotes on working with Linda McCartney as a vocalist. RAM Deluxe reissue liner notes.  Released May 2012. https://www.paulmccartney.com/news-blogs/news/paul-and-linda-mccartneys-legendary-album-ram-set-for-deluxe-reissue 

talking-perfectly-loud asked:

I’d love a “King Foot-in-Mouth” episode! All about Paul’s many many failings as a PR man and why his reputation as such is ridiculous

~ Our Tumblr Asks

Hi, @talking-perfectly-loud ! LOL, that would be quite a listen for sure! There’s a veritable goldmine of Paul being King Foot-in-Mouth from over the years.

I think people genuinely confuse being affable, professional, and pleasant in interview settings with actual “public relations” which does include charisma to a point, but it also includes crafting a compelling and interesting narrative and having some measure of control over how you’re perceived by the public.

Good PR is understanding how certain statements may be interpreted and how to use carefully crafted messaging and branding to shape public perception. People usually need help and coaching from a professional in this area to be able to do it well.

Paul is simply not gifted in this arena as evidenced by telling the same four Beatles-centric stories in every interview, being exceptionally untalented at explaining his political and social justice beliefs without it coming out in a hamfisted or tone-deaf way, and being stingy in terms of releasing his coolest unreleased (officially anyway) solo works.

Happy 50th Anniversary to this gorgeous, groundbreaking, and innovative masterwork, which still sounds half a century later!

Also, stay tuned later this week for a mini AKOM episode commemorating this important milestone anniversary!

A Tumblr User Asked:

thanks for answering my question earlier! i’ll put shout lower on the list. also, i’d love an episode on maxwell’s silver hammer. there’s so much going on there. love the pod and appreciate what you guys are doing!

Hi there, Thalia here 🙂 Thanks so much for this amazing comment and suggestion! You are right, there is a lot going on “Maxwell’s Silver Hammer.”  We’re glad you’re enjoying the show, and we hope you keep listening!

 

Female Protagonists in McCartney Songs

What can we learn about Paul McCartney from the female protagonists in his songbook? Phoebe and Thalia discuss several McCartney compositions featuring prominent female characters and identify their central themes.

Sources:

Sources:
“Many Years From Now” by Barry Miles (1997)
Interview w/ Allison Anders, Bomb Magazine (1997)
Paul McCartney interview w/ Jonathan Wingate Record Collector (2008)
“Chaos and Creation at Abbey Road” (2006)
“Still I Rise” by Maya Angelou (1978)
“The Oprah Winfrey Show” (1984)
Interview w/ Paul McCartney for Billboard Magazine (2001)
Paul McCartney Interview w/ Susan Goldberg for National Geographic (2017)

PLAYLIST:
She’s Leaving Home (1967)
Jet (1973)
Blackbird (1968)
Jenny Wren (2005)
Working Women at the Top (1991)
It’s Not On (1982)
Temporary Secretary (1980)
Another Day (1971)
Penny Lane (1967)
Eleanor Rigby (1966)
Eleanor’s Dream (1984)
Treat Her Gently/Lonely Old People (1975)
English Tea (2005)
Let it Be (1970)
Imprisonment, Ocean’s Kingdom (2011)
Daytime Nighttime Suffering (1979)
Mama’s Little Girl (1973)
The World You’re Coming Into (1991)
Lady Madonna (1968)
For No One (1966)

Extended Spotify Playlist: Click Here

On Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Podbean, and most other podcast platforms.