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Female Protagonists in McCartney Songs

What can we learn about Paul McCartney from the female protagonists in his songbook? Phoebe and Thalia discuss several McCartney compositions featuring prominent female characters and identify their central themes.

Sources:

Sources:
“Many Years From Now” by Barry Miles (1997)
Interview w/ Allison Anders, Bomb Magazine (1997)
Paul McCartney interview w/ Jonathan Wingate Record Collector (2008)
“Chaos and Creation at Abbey Road” (2006)
“Still I Rise” by Maya Angelou (1978)
“The Oprah Winfrey Show” (1984)
Interview w/ Paul McCartney for Billboard Magazine (2001)
Paul McCartney Interview w/ Susan Goldberg for National Geographic (2017)

PLAYLIST:
She’s Leaving Home (1967)
Jet (1973)
Blackbird (1968)
Jenny Wren (2005)
Working Women at the Top (1991)
It’s Not On (1982)
Temporary Secretary (1980)
Another Day (1971)
Penny Lane (1967)
Eleanor Rigby (1966)
Eleanor’s Dream (1984)
Treat Her Gently/Lonely Old People (1975)
English Tea (2005)
Let it Be (1970)
Imprisonment, Ocean’s Kingdom (2011)
Daytime Nighttime Suffering (1979)
Mama’s Little Girl (1973)
The World You’re Coming Into (1991)
Lady Madonna (1968)
For No One (1966)

Extended Spotify Playlist: Click Here

On Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Podbean, and most other podcast platforms.

Jealous Guy: Lennon/McCartney and Competitive Admiration

An essay that explores the inspiration, background, and meaning of John Lennon’s song “Jealous Guy” and its connection to Paul McCartney.

Where to Listen

New AKOM is HERE!

Thru the AKOM Lens – Going Underground: Paul McCartney, The Beatles, and the UK Counter-Culture

Where to Listen

In this episode of our series Thru the AKOM Lens, Phoebe and Thalia discuss and unpack the documentary Going Underground: Paul McCartney, The Beatles, and the UK Counter-Culture. This fascinating and thought-provoking film covers an extremely important yet often uncelebrated period of not only McCartney and the Beatles, but also pop culture history!

When you’re done listening, be sure to listen to the Spotify playlist we’ve curated as a companion to this episode:  Check it out here!

On the Paul or Nothing podcast, Phoebe and Sam obstensibly discuss the cover art for Band On the Run and Venus & Mars. Do they manage to accomplish either of these simple tasks? Listen to find out!

Listen here or wherever you find podcasts!

New AKOM Episode! Thru the AKOM Lens: Lester & Maysles!

In this episode of our new series examining the Beatles on film, Phoebe and Kristen discuss fantasy, reality and the creation of the Beatles myth with two landmark films from the start of Beatlemania: A Hard Day’s Night and The Beatles First US Visit

Where to Listen

onesweetdreampodcast:

NEW BREAKUP SERIES EPISODE OUT AT ONE SWEET DREAM

10 DAYS IN SEPTEMBER ‘69: Paul (PART A)
Find out what Paul’s up to in these critical days in September!

Please note the breakup series has moved to One Sweet Dream Podcast!
@onesweetdreamdi onesweetdreampodcast.com
@anotherkindofmindpod
Please subscribe to One Sweet Dream Podcast. I have lots of great stuff to share 🙂 xoxo Diana

We are taking a little break from our Lennon/McCartney Breakup Series to bring you this interview with the fabulous Chris O’Dell!

In this episode Diana and Thalia have a conversation with Chris O’Dell, the author of the book Miss O’Dell: My Hard Days And Long Nights With The Beatles, The Stones, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton And The Women They Loved. Chris O’Dell has led an extraordinary life as a close friend of the Beatles, Pattie Boyd and Maureen Starkey.  She was an early Apple employee, worked for Peter Asher and was among the world’s first female tour managers.  She worked on many legendary tours, including the iconic 70’s tours of Bob Dylan, George Harrison, The Rolling Stones, and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.  She was the subject of George Harrison’s song “Miss O’Dell” as well as Leon Russell’s songs “Pisces Apple Lady” and “Hummingbird.”

We dig into hot topics like Apple in the early days, the day John quit the Beatles, the Maureen/Ringo/George triangle; Paul in 1968, Paul and Linda as a couple. John Lennon during the “lost weekend,” the day Paul quit the Beatles and George’s reaction. the Beatles vs. the Stones, and much more.

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Anonymous asked:

Hello, just want to say that I’m addicted to your podcasts and keep up with the great work! Thank you so much~

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Anonymous asked:

Hey, really enjoying the podcast. Just out of curiosity is the next episode going to be out anytime in the near future? No pressure of course!

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Hi Listener, thank you so much! We’re excited to hear that you’re enjoying our show. We are working on the next one at the moment, so keep your eyes peeled for a new one coming soon! 🙂

On this day in 1957, Paul impressed John with his amazing guitar skills and rock star charisma at the Woolton Garden Fete!

As John would reflect many years later, “That was the day, the day that I met Paul, that it started moving.”

Painting by artist Eric Cash

Anonymous asked:

why did Klein call Paul “a reluctant virgin” anyway? was it just because Paul wouldn’t sign, or was it supposed to have insulted his personality/temperament? I’ve always been confused by that insult

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Here’s the quote:

“But it was impossible in the end, because it became three to one and I was like the idiot in the corner – trying, I thought, to save the situation. And to Klein it looked like I was trying to screw the situation. He used to call me the Reluctant Virgin. I said, ‘Fuck off, I don’t want to fucking marry you, that’s all.’ he’s going, ‘Oh, you know, he may, maybe he will, will he, won’t he, that’s a definite maybe.’ It was really difficult.”

We think this statement was simply an uncouth and bullying way to goad Paul into action when he appeared to be waffling on the management issue. It is a way of dismissing Paul’s real concerns, suggesting the reason Paul didn’t want to metaphorically “go all the way” with Klein was due to Paul’s prudishness, rather than based on reason.

It also suggests that Paul was being coy on the subject rather than the reality, which seems to have been that Paul was decisive and determined in his dislike of Klein based on reason, research and his honed ability to smell a bullshitter in a way the others couldn’t.

In fact, Paul turned out to be the most street smart and cunning in terms of sussing Klein out, and this was Klein’s way of delegitimizing his concerns.